Biology and Biological Sciences

Program Requirements

Biological Sciences majors take two semesters of Fundamentals of Chemistry during their freshman year followed by two semesters of Organic Chemistry. Biochemistry is a recommended elective for students interested in organismal biology. Two semesters of Fundamentals of Physics and a minimum math requirement of Calculus I and a statistics course round out the physical science and math background.

Biology majors take one semester of Chemistry and two semesters of Fundamentals of Physics. A minimum math requirement of college algebra and a statistics course round out the physical science and mathematics background. Thirty-nine hours of biology courses at the 300-400 level allow the student to customize his/her education.

Advanced Placement Opportunity

  • CLEP General Biology Exam may yield 3 semester hours of credit for BIO 150
  • CLEP Microbiology Exam may yield 3 semester hours of credit for BIO 232

Bachelor of Arts in Biology

  • Completion of the Bonaventure Program and requirements for undergraduate degrees, pp. 6-10.
  • The technological literacy requirement will be fulfilled through conducting computerized labs and learning how to use the computer for scientific research in all laboratory courses.
  • Core classes: BIO 150, 151, 497 (senior year).
  • 30 hours of Biology electives at the 200-400 level.
  • CHE 125; two semesters of Physics (PHY 211-212).
  • One semester of mathematics at the highest level for which the student is prepared with college algebra as a minimum.
  • One semester of a statistics course.
  • The student needs a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all BIO(logy) courses to receive a degree.
  • The student needs a minimum of 39 semester hours at the 300-400 level (all courses) to receive a degree.

Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences

  • Completion of the Bonaventure Program and requirements for undergraduate degrees, pp. 7-11.
  • The technological literacy requirement will be fulfilled through conducting computerized labs and learning how to use the computer for scientific research in all laboratory courses.
  • Core classes: BIO 150, 151, 232, 305, 327, 330, 350, and 497 (senior year).
  • 17 hours of Biology electives at the 200-400 level of which only three courses may be at the 200-level.
  • Required Science classes: CHE 150-151, CHE 302-303, PHY 211-212, (CHE 321 highly recommended).
  • Required Math classes: MAT 242 and a statistics course.
  • The student needs a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all BIO(logy) courses to receive a degree.
  • The student needs a minimum of 39 semester hours at the 300-400 level (all courses) to receive a degree.
  • PHI 323 Bioethics is strongly recommended.

Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences
(Environmental Concentration)

  • Completion of the Liberal Arts Foundation Program and requirements for undergraduate degrees, pp. 6-10.
  • The technological literacy requirement will be fulfilled through conducting computerized labs and learning how to use the computer for scientific research in all laboratory courses.
  • Core classes: BIO 150, 151, 232, 282, 305, 327, 350, and 497 (senior year).
  • Environmental requirements: BIO 221, 321, 357, 358, 435, 436.
  • Required Science classes: CHE 150-151, CHE 302-303, PHY 211-212, CHE 321 (highly recommended).
  • Required Math classes: MAT 242 and a statistics course.
  • The student needs a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all BIO(logy) courses to receive a degree.
  • The student needs a minimum of 39 semester hours at the 300-400 level (all courses) to receive a degree.
  • PHI 325 Environmental Ethics is strongly recommended.

Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences
(Pre-Medical Sciences Concentration)

  • Completion of the Liberal Arts Foundation Program and requirements for undergraduate degrees, pp. 6-10.
  • The technological literacy requirement will be fulfilled through conducting computerized labs and learning how to use the computer for scientific research in all laboratory courses.
  • Core classes: BIO 150, 151, 250, 282, 305, 327, 350, 497 (senior year).
  • Pre-professional requirements: BIO 232, 283, 330, 360, 410, and 433.
  • Required Science classes: CHE 150-151, CHE 302-303, PHY 211-212, (CHE 321 highly recommended).
  • Required Math classes: MAT 242 and a statistics course.
  • The student needs a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all BIO(logy) courses to receive a degree.
  • The student needs a minimum of 39 semester hours at the 300-400 level (all courses) to receive a degree.
  • PHI 323 Bioethics is strongly recommended.

Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences
(Pre-Physical Therapy Concentration)

  • General requirements for baccalaureate degree, p. 8.
  • The technological literacy requirement will be fulfilled through conducting computerized labs and through computerized scientific research.
  • Core classes: BIO 150, 151, 232, 282, 283, 305, 327, 328, 350, 354, 360, 410 or 433, 497.
  • Pre-Physical Therapy support requirements: PED 106, 152, 236, 301, 344, 345, 444, 454.
  • Required Science classes: CHE 150-151, PHY 211-212.
  • Required Math classes: MAT 150 and 242.
  • The student needs a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all BIO(logy) courses to receive a degree.
  • The student needs a minimum of 39 semester hours at the 300-400 level (all courses) to receive a degree.
  • PHI 323 Bioethics is strongly recommended.
  • Internships with local physical therapists are strongly recommended.

Teacher Licensure

  • Completion of the Bonaventure Program and requirements for undergraduate degrees, pp. 6-10 including POL 200, PSY 246, HIS 111 or HIS 112, and PED 265.
  • Required Biology courses: BIO 150, 151, 221, 232, 282 or 283, 305, 327, 340, 350, 357 or 358, 435, and 497 (Senior year).
  • Required support courses: CHE 150, 151, 302 and 309; PHY 211 and 212; MAT 142, a statistics course, and SCI 100.
  • Requirements for teacher licensure listed on pp. 81-83 and BIO 400.
  • A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.60 is required for acceptance into the Teacher Education Program.

Requirements for a Minor

  • The Biology Program offers various programs of study for a Minor (see p. 23). The student should consult with one of the biology faculty members early in order to prepare for such a program.
  • Coursework for a minor includes 18 hours of BIO(logy) credit, only 6 hours of which may be at the 100 level. Must also meet minimum University requirements for a minor.

Biological Sciences

BIO 103 - Problems in the Environment
Credit Hours: 3
A study of ecological principles and current environmental problems including air, water, and noise pollution, population, energy, solid waste disposal, radiation hazards, inorganic contaminants, pesticides, soil conservation. Two lecture periods, two hours laboratory.

BIO 105 - Human Biology
Credit Hours: 3
A non-major course to introduce the student to an understanding of the human body. Two lecture periods and two hours of laboratory.

BIO 111 - Life Sciences
Credit Hours: 4
This course is designed to fulfill the science component of the general education requirements for non-science majors. The course is a combination of various introductory life-science courses and the integration of their contents, including: general biology, ecology, evolution, botany, zoology, and human biology. Three lecture periods, two hours laboratory.

BIO 150 - Principles of Biology I
Credit Hours: 4
A study of the fundamental principles of biology for the biology major. Cell structure and function, genetics and evolution are discussed, with exposure to biological literature and experience in scientific writing skills. Three lecture periods, three hours laboratory.
Recommendation(s): high school biology and chemistry

BIO 151 - Principles of Biology II
Credit Hours: 4
An introduction to the kingdoms of life (Monerans, Protists, Fungi, and Plants), evolution, natural selection, plant structure and plant physiology. Three lecture periods, three hours laboratory.

BIO 221 - Invertebrate Zoology
Credit Hours: 3
Morphology, physiology, life cycles and phylogeny of animal groups from poriferans through echinoderms. Two lecture periods, three hours laboratory.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 111 or BIO 150.

BIO 232 - Microbiology
Credit Hours: 3
This course acquaints the students with micro- organisms and their activities. Topics include cell structure and function, metabolism, growth, the role of microorganisms in disease immunity, and other selected areas. The laboratory will stress aseptic technique, culturing methods, control of microbial growth and unknown identification. Two lecture periods, three hours laboratory.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 150 and BIO 151.

BIO 270-9 Special Topics (1-3)
Special topics in biology in depth, depending on demand and staff.

BIO 280 Medical Terminology (2)
Medical Terminology exposes students to the root words, combining forms, prefixes, and suffixes that are used in medical and related fields. Students interested in familiarity with the language used in health care professions are encouraged to take this course.

BIO 282-283 Anatomy and Physiology I & II (4)(4)
Two-semester course sequence with a two-hour lab and three lecture periods. First semester, the lab covers anatomy; lectures include cells, tissues, skin, muscle, nerves, and circulatory system. Second semester, the lab covers physiology; lectures include respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine, acid-base balance, and reproductive systems.

BIO 305 Genetics (3)
An in-depth study of the principles of both classical and molecular genetics. Prerequisites: BIO 150 and 151.

BIO 310-312 Molecular Biology Technique Series (I, II, & III) (1-2)
The Molecular Biology Technique Series (MBT) introduces students to the most commonly used techniques in the molecular biology research setting. Each course builds on the previous, is primarily conducted on the student's own time, and is a track into conducting research in molecular biology. The first course in the series familiarizes the student with the basic tools that are used in molecular biology research - sterile techniques, solution preparation, micropipette usage, DNA manipulation, use of restriction enzymes, and gel electrophoresis. The second in the series will include the manipulation of plasmid DNA, cloning a DNA fragment produced using PCR, extracting and purifying DNA, transformation of E. coli, and microorganism growth. In the third course the student will start a research project that may utilize new techniques, such as Southern blotting. Prerequisites: BIO 305 and 350 and consent of instructor. BIO 321 Entomology (3) An introduction to the study of insects, with emphasis on evolution, classification, physiology and behavior. Prerequisite: BIO 150.

BIO 327 - Ecology
Credit Hours: 3
Basic ecological principles with emphasis on the interrelationships between organisms and their environment, populations, communities, and ecosystems. Two lecture periods, three hours laboratory and field work.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 150 of 151

BIO 328 - Advanced Topics in Anatomy and Physiology
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on advanced topics in Anatomy and Physiology for majors. Three hour lecture period.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 282 and 283

BIO 330 Developmental Biology (3)
A study of the maturation of gametes, fertilization,the differentiation of germ layers, and the
formation of fetal organ systems in selected vertebrate and some invertebrate types. Laboratory
consists of an intensive, descriptive study of whole mounts and serial sections of starfish,
amphioxus, frog, chick and pig. Two lecture periods, three hours laboratory. Strongly recommended:
BIO 282-283. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

BIO 335 Journal Club - (1)
Groundbreaking Science Journal Club is a guided tour through the rich world of scientific literature. Articles chronicling important research are read and discussed in order to gain a deeper understanding of how
science is performed and reported. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

BIO 340 Organic Evolution (3)
Principles of the neodarwinian process, the central theory of biology.

BIO 350 Molecular Biology (3)
An in-depth study of the fundamental concepts of structure and function of plants, animals, and microbial cells. Two lecture periods, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 305 and Junior standing.

BIO 354 Pathophysiology (3)
A study of the disease process along with the normal physiology of the body systems and
the clinical relationships which are appropriate. Three lecture periods. Prerequisites: BIO 282-283.

BIO 356 Ecology of the Galapagos (3)
An examination of the factors affecting the distribution and abundance of organisms on the Galapagos Islands. Trip fee required. Prerequisite: BIO 151 or consent of instructor.

BIO 357 Environmental Science I (3)
A study of ecological, economic, and social aspects of current environmental problems. Topics include the history of environmental problems, human population issues, global problems, soil conservation, and food resources. Two lecture
periods, three hours laboratory.

BIO 358 Environmental Science II (3)
A continuation of BIO 357. Topics include water resources, biodiversity, wildlife resources, renewable and nonrenewable energy resources, mineral resources, solid waste, air pollution, water pollution, and pesticides. Two lecture
periods, three hours laboratory.

BIO 360 Neurobiology (3)
This course introduces students to the biology of the nervous system and its relationship to behavior and disease. The course covers topics ranging from neuronal structure andfunction, communication, the synapse, membrane receptors, and intra- and intercellular signaling systems, to the gross organizationof the brain and spinal cord, the processing of sensory information, the programming ofmotor response, and higher functions, such as hearing, memory, cognition, and speech. While the course is introductory in nature, the level of instruction is rigorous and treats many of the topics in some depth. While this course will have a great degree of serious content, it will also be highly interactive both in the classroom and lab setting. Two lecture periods, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 150, 151, 232, 350 and Junior standing.

BIO 370-9 Special Topics (1-3)
Special topics in biology in depth, depending on demand and staff.

BIO 400 Methods of Teaching Biology (3)
Designed to acquaint students with instructional strategies for teaching of biological sciences in the secondary school. Required for those seeking state licensure. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the teacher education program.

BIO 410 Immunology (3)
Survey of the immunological system including both humoral and cellular immunological phenomena, immunochemistry, antibody production, immunogenetics, hypersensitivity, tolerance, and immunological reactions. Two
lecture periods, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 232.

BIO 415 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Lab (1-2)
This course is designed to expose the student to the evolution of the organ systems in animal
representatives of the Phylum Chordata. Students will develop skills in reading dissection
atlases, identifying structures, and observing organ systems among the specimens. Prerequisites:
BIO 282 and 283, or consent of instructor.

BIO 433 Endocrinology (3)
A study of structure and function of the glands of internal secretion. This course will also focus
on HPA, HPT, and HPG axes: Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal, Hypothalamic Pituitary Thyroid,
and Hypothalamic Pituitary Gonadal and their importance to the normal functioning
of the body. Two lecture periods, three hours laboratory.

BIO 435 Plant Field Biology (3)
Taxonomy, development and ecology of plants especially those of the region. Two lecture
periods, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 151.

BIO 436 Vertebrate Field Biology (3)
Survey of resources and methods for studying North American vertebrates including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Two lecture periods, three hours laboratory.

BIO 440 Bioinformatics/Genomics (2)
In our lifetime Bioinformatics and Genomics will be a defining turn in our comprehension of how organisms work from the molecular level to organism level. These fields of study are at the cutting edge of science, especially for understanding human disease in the 21st century. Bioinformatics, an interdisciplinary field of biology and computer science, is based on garnering information from large biological databases using algorithms to mine data for relevant and meaningful genetic information. It especially relies on DNA, RNA, and protein sequence databases of organisms. Bioinformatics intersects with genomics, the genetic material of an organism, by utilizing genomic databases. In genomics, the genetic material of an organism is sequenced and patterns that dictate regulation, organizational patterns of gene expression, and how the genome functions as a whole, rather than at the discrete level of genes, is covered.

BIO 470-9 Special Topics (3)
Special topics in biology in depth, depending on demand and staff.

BIO 480 Independent Research (1-3)
Individual research performed in consultation with a biology teacher. Primarily for seniors majoring in Biological Sciences.

BIO 497 Coordinating Seminar (1)
Pertinent topics discussed by students. Required for all biology majors. One lecture period during which students present both written and oral papers.

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